Tahini and Carob molasses (Debess u tahineh)

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Move over peanut butter and jelly, move over dulce de leche, I got me my dibs wa tahini! I am going to sit down somewhere and savor that creamy, dark, sweet,nutty, earthy, intensely satisfying combination of tahini and carob molasses. It is going to take me all of five seconds to open the jars, pour the dibs and tahini on my plate and mix them with my spoon and then quickly slather some on my bread. Oh joy and contentment!

When I saw a jar of dibs el-kharroob (carob molasses) at Sara Bakery I could not contain my excitement. I was going to relive moments with my Teta Nabiha and my Tante Claire who would pull out the dibs and tahini from the cupboard and  eat it with a piece of bread late at night when a desire for something sweet was tugging.

INGREDIENTS:

1 jar of dibs el-kharroob, 1 teaspoon per serving

1 jar of tahini, 2 tablespoons per serving

METHOD:

Pour some dibs and some tahini on your plate . With a spoon stir to mix the two  as much or as little as you desire. Take a piece of bread and dip it in or slather some with the spoon on the bread. Enjoy and Sahteyn!

NOTE:

Some people like to dip a plain cookie ( such as a Marie cookie)  into the dibs wa tahini, in lieu of bread.

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بيلحس الدبس عن الطحينه

(Proverb from South Lebanon: ” he can lick the dibs from the tahini“-meaning: he is so skilled, nothing is too difficult for him. Proverbes populaires du Liban-sud, F.J.Abela)

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7 Comments

  1. Leyla
    Posted August 31, 2009 at 9:40 pm | Permalink

    Hi Joummana,
    we used to eat it with cucumber:)

  2. Joumana
    Posted September 1, 2009 at 10:14 am | Permalink

    Interesting! I will have to try it!

  3. Posted September 1, 2009 at 7:46 pm | Permalink

    صحتين و عافية. عنجد ذكرتيني عن طفولتي مع الدبس و طحينة
    I don’t have any carob molasses now, which is a good thing because I would probably go into the kitchen and eat more dibs wa tahineh than I should :)
    I’m also interested in trying Leyla’s version with cucumber – sounds interesting.

  4. Joumana
    Posted September 1, 2009 at 8:54 pm | Permalink

    I am so crazy for the stuff now! Ohlala, very dangerous like you say!

  5. Posted June 19, 2010 at 4:43 am | Permalink

    Here i can find the grape molasses but not the carob molasses. I buy it and mix it with tahini, it tastes the same!

  6. Lucie
    Posted February 21, 2013 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    I have some carob molasses at home and have no idea what to do with them. I shall certainly give this a try but do you have any other ideas? I’ve just popped some in a crumble which will hopefully be a lovely but any other ideas would be welcome, it’s a rather large bottle!

  7. Joumana
    Posted February 21, 2013 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

    @Lucie: I have a passion for grape molasses actually; carob molasses can be used in conjunction with brown sugar in cakes, cookies, salad dressings, puddings, stews (especially beans), with bulgur pilaf, etc. Just start with small quantities and test it; I have also discovered that if you add a tiny amount of molasses (date, grape, maybe even carob) to concentrated milk, you can have something that tastes like caramel to add to your favorite apple pie.

2 Trackbacks

  1. [...] reason I am not afraid of molasses and tahini is simple: us Lebanese grew up eating molasses and tahini, mixed in, on a piece of bread as a simple, traditional, but immensely satisfying dessert (or [...]

  2. […] reason I am not afraid of molasses and tahini is simple: us Lebanese grew up eating molasses and tahini, mixed in, on a piece of bread as a simple, traditional, but immensely satisfying dessert (or […]

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