Muhammara with chips

Muhammara is one of the main condiments in the  Lebanese culinary repertoire;  served as a mezze item (to dip into) and as a side sauce with kebabs, it can be used in dozens of  dishes.

Simple to make, with the assertive and warm flavor of red peppers made a tad fruity by the addition of pomegranate molasses,  you will use it in your kitchen like you would ketchup!

INGREDIENTS: Quantity will yield 14.1 oz or 400 g.

  • 3 large red bell peppers (about 8 ounces of paste or 230 g.)
  • 4 cloves of garlic (.2 oz or 5 g.)
  • Walnuts (1.8 oz or 50 g.)
  • Ground cumin (3/4 teaspoon or 3 ml)
  • Pomegranate molasses (1 Tablespoon +1/2 teaspoon or 15 ml)
  • 1 small onion (1.2 oz or 40 g.)
  • 1 teaspoon of red chili paste or Aleppo pepper or smoked paprika
  • Salt (1 teaspoon or 5 ml)
  • 1/4 cup of olive oil (extra-virgin) (2 oz or 60 g.)

METHOD:

  1. Place the walnuts in a bowl, add water to cover and soak for one hour.
  2. Peel the garlic cloves, chop and place in a mortar with the salt; pound and mash the garlic.
  3. Wash the peppers and place on a foil-lined cookie sheet under the broiler, turning them every few minutes until the skin is blackened and charred. At this point, place the peppers in a plastic bag with a couple of tablespoons of water, close the bag tightly for 10 minutes. Open the bag and peel off the skins of the peppers; cut the peppers open and discard all the seeds and white parts inside, as well as the stem.
  4. Peel the onion and cut in quarters.
  5. Place the peppers, onion, mashed garlic, drained walnuts, cumin, pomegranate molasses, red chili paste or paprika  and olive oil in the bowl of a food processor. Process for one minute or until the mixture is smooth yet still thick and with some texture. Taste to adjust seasoning and transfer the sauce to a bowl, cover and refrigerate.

NOTE: I have made muhammara with a jar of roasted piquillo peppers and it came out delicious!

It is OK to double the amount of walnuts: The sauce will taste richer with a thicker texture; it all depends on what you will use it for.

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Print This Post Print This Post

55 Comments

  1. Joumana
    Posted February 4, 2013 at 12:37 am | Permalink

    @Hazzi: Can you give me more details and I will ask around to see if someone knows this type of kaak. I wonder if it was what is called kaak be-haleeb here and it is close to a roll.

  2. hazzi
    Posted February 4, 2013 at 7:43 pm | Permalink

    Hi Joumana, Off memory it was more as a biscuit and we used to dip it in her coffee to eat it. I know it had sugar, aniseed not sure if it is milk and butter or just milk. Also they are round and sprinkled with sesame seeds then baked. I know that some people have made this kaak using oil and making the dough with orange juice apposed from using water and milk. I will also ask around and if I find it I will email the recipe across for you to try :)

  3. Joumana
    Posted February 4, 2013 at 11:12 pm | Permalink

    @Hazzi: I think I know this one, it is the kaak bel yansoon, with anise. Thanks! If you get me a recipe I will surely try it on the blog.

  4. Mangalore Cafe
    Posted February 21, 2014 at 3:29 am | Permalink

    Ah! finally an authentic recipe without bread crumbs!!
    I wondered how can there be breadcrumbs in a Lebanese dish. Unless PIta bread left a lot of bread crumbs :-P
    Its sad so many recipes are lost. Especially when it reaches America. Either the americans think they can re-invent the wheel or many just don’t know the recipe and simply proceed to do what they think it would be.

    Thanks to you these authentic recipes are alive, others (I am from India) can try the real taste of beirut :-)

  5. Posted March 27, 2014 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    Hi Joumana,

    When it comes to Lebanese cuisine or just about any cuisine for that matter, you are my go to resource. Trust you and your recipes always!

    So should come as no surprise am carrying your Muhammara with chips to a potluck this weekend and will add more walnuts for a nuttier texture.

    hugs!

    Devaki @ weavethousandflavors

12 Trackbacks

  1. By Dogs and crêpes on May 5, 2011 at 6:11 pm

    [...] the muhammara recipe, click here. In this recipe, I used red pepper paste in a jar; of course, it would taste finer with actual red [...]

  2. By Beoreg with chicken liver and cheese on May 12, 2011 at 4:54 am

    [...] 1/2 cups of prepared muhammara sauce (click here for a [...]

  3. [...] Where I found my inspiration [...]

  4. By Croque-sardines on July 10, 2011 at 7:31 am

    [...] recipe is available here. Tweet [Translate] « Amardeen cake  Print This [...]

  5. By Mashallah News → Mountain food on August 18, 2011 at 10:33 am

    [...] pomegranate molasses which is a staple in Lebanese kitchens and essential to dishes like fattoush, mohammara, and stuffed vegetables. Today, with debes ruman being mass-produced, it is small-scale farmers and [...]

  6. By Muhammara kebabs on March 26, 2012 at 11:34 am

    [...] cup of muhammara sauce (click here for the [...]

  7. By Kibbeh sajieh on April 5, 2012 at 2:40 pm

    [...] onions and walnuts and spiced with hot chili pepper and pomegranate molasses. Served with some muhammara dip on the [...]

  8. [...] 1/2 cups of prepared muhammara sauce (click here for a [...]

  9. By Muhammara kebabs | Food Recipes on July 11, 2012 at 4:23 am

    [...] cup of muhammara sauce (click here for the [...]

  10. By Kibbeh sajieh | Food Recipes on July 11, 2012 at 10:23 am

    [...] onions and walnuts and spiced with hot chili pepper and pomegranate molasses. Served with some muhammara dip on the [...]

  11. By Muhammara (Red Bell Pepper-Walnut Dip) on September 17, 2013 at 7:57 am

    […] Adapted from Taste of Beirut […]

  12. […] Recept till denna dipp kommer från en härlig blogg Taste of Beirut. […]

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>