Mysterious kitchen tool

Found this in a Beirut supermarket; it is a rolling pin with stationary blades (one inch or so apart).

Can anybody guess what it is used for?

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27 Comments

  1. Emily Burns
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:11 am | Permalink

    A pasta or noodle cutter?

  2. Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:12 am | Permalink

    For making pasta?

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  3. Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:23 am | Permalink

    cutting pasta into even sizes?

  4. Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:31 am | Permalink

    I am stumped! Is it for cutting pasta? Or strips of pastry?

  5. Posted December 28, 2011 at 10:03 am | Permalink

    I use it for making fettuccine, pie stripes and the like.

  6. Posted December 28, 2011 at 10:08 am | Permalink

    Huh. Stationary? I was going to say a pastry cutter – like to separate filo dough….

  7. Posted December 28, 2011 at 10:20 am | Permalink

    Guess one: I’m going with a tool to cut phyllo dough.
    Guess two: Something to shake at a spouse to get him to take the garbage out.

  8. Liz
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 10:33 am | Permalink

    Is it to cut the dough into even strips :)

  9. Posted December 28, 2011 at 11:21 am | Permalink

    I, too am thinking a pasta, but I don’t think that pasta is part of Lebanese cuisine, right? Perhaps bread or cheese for finger foods?

    Alaiyo

  10. Shreela
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    Twisty bread?
    Spiral wraps for sausages?

  11. Posted December 28, 2011 at 1:01 pm | Permalink

    What a coincidence, I saw this video on youtube on how to make peanut brittle (chikki) in India. This guy has used this tool to cut the brittle into small pieces.

    Take a look

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRmCFE_N4Ys

  12. elz0oz
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    it is used to cut a dough in even width,
    like if you are doing a phylo dough, you need to use this tool to cut the dough…
    hope it explains the thing

  13. ummomar
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    This kind of peanut sweets are very popular I think all over the arab world, specially in the times of feast. But living in Egypt for many years now, I have never heard of or seen anyone making it at home. It is always bought from special shops.

  14. Posted December 28, 2011 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

    Going to have to go with pasta slicer? But it wouldn’t be super-efficient to have a specialized tool that only made fixed-width pasta … unless it was for ravioli? Two slices?

  15. Posted December 28, 2011 at 5:08 pm | Permalink

    Yeah, looks like noodle cutter to me!!

  16. Posted December 28, 2011 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

    Hmmm, for Baklava, maybe?

  17. Saba Ammari
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:02 pm | Permalink

    Shushbarak?

  18. Coleen
    Posted December 28, 2011 at 8:46 pm | Permalink

    A pasta cutter! I’ve been looking for one and can’t seem to find one in the Atlanta, GA area. I think there are some where you can adjust the width of the pasta. I am looking forward to seeing what you make with it.

  19. Posted December 29, 2011 at 2:57 am | Permalink

    :)) It’s for making our delicious dish,Turkish MANTI. As you know Mantı is;stuffed mince meat in square shape pasta, and boil in boiling salty water then put onmantı-pasta the plate you can serve them yogurt with garlic and tomato sauce. The important thing is What for you’ll use it.

  20. Joumana
    Posted December 29, 2011 at 6:30 am | Permalink

    @Sare: You got it! The label said “Mantimatik”.

    @Coleen: You are right, it is for cutting pasta but it is stationary because it is meant for one specific pasta only : Manti
    @Saba: Close, the Turkish or Armenian version, manti!
    @Tobias: Not for baklava, but could be used to cut phyllo for sure!
    @Deana: it is for a noodle, manti; the other pasta cutter have adjustable blades
    @Steve: You are right, specifically for manti which is made with pasta dough and stuffed like an open ravioli

    @Shreela:Could be used for these purposes I suppose! However here it is for manti only
    @Alaiyo: You are right, again it is specificallly for manti
    @Liz: You are right too, it will cut the manti into an even square
    @Tom: Sorry but love your ideas!

  21. Joumana
    Posted December 29, 2011 at 6:32 am | Permalink

    @Italian notes: it is too wide for fettuccine; perfect for even-shaped manti
    @Rachel K. It is for cutting pasta into a square, hundreds of squares for manti
    @doggybloggy: you are right, you cut one way then perpendicular and you get the perfect square for manti
    @Rosa: right the pasta is called manti

  22. Posted December 29, 2011 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

    Joumana, is there a place to purchase the mantimatik in the US? BTW, I love the name!

  23. Joumana
    Posted December 29, 2011 at 4:59 pm | Permalink

    @Robyn: I don’t know since I only found it in Beirut; I would try Armenian delis in Fresno or Glendale in California.

  24. Posted December 30, 2011 at 1:41 am | Permalink

    Although I love Tom’s answer, I’d go for pasta cutter too. Very cool!

  25. Joumana
    Posted December 30, 2011 at 4:17 am | Permalink

    @Jamie: It is a pasta cutter for a special pasta, manti

  26. Posted December 30, 2011 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

    I was thinking papardelle – a very wide noodle. That would have come in very handy when I made Manti. I think I used a pizza wheel, but I tend to wobble when I do that and don’t always get even lines. You could probably use it for halva too, if you inverted it out of the pan first. Or heck, even fudge. Hmmmm … I think I might have to keep an eye out for one of these. :)

  27. Posted December 30, 2011 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    I would have guessed to cut pasta…very cool gadget :)

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