Cream of pumpkin soup

 

The US dollar is readily accepted by merchants in Lebanon; in fact, even if one pays with a credit card the cashier will immediately ask “Dollars or Lebanese?” and compute the bill in the corresponding currency. What is neat too is that if you end up being  shortchanged by the currency conversion, say your bill is LL31,000 (the equivalent of US$20.65) and you hand over US$21, which is 500LL more than asked, the cashier will give you a bag of nuts or gum or some candy to make it an even exchange. 

It can be overwhelming when the pumpkins start to show up in the garden and we cart back a ten-pounder to the kitchen every few days. One way to solve this is to cut the pumpkin up into small chunks and freeze them as is in ziploc bags; each bag holds  about one pound, enough for a dish or a baking session. 

INGREDIENTS: 6 to 8 servings

  • 2 lbs of pumpkin, cut up
  • 2 onions or 2 cups of leeks (white part only), chopped fine
  • salt, pepper
  • 1 cup of cream (or milk)
  • dash of cinnamon and nutmeg (optional)
  • 4 tbsp of  butter or 1/4 cup of olive oil
METHOD:
 
  1. Melt the butter and sauté the leeks, chopped in thin slices (or the onions)till softened and translucent. Add the pumpkin and fry for a few minutes as well to soften; add the spices and 6 cups of water (or chicken broth). Simmer for 30 minutes. 
  2. Purée the mixture in a blender, transfer back to the pot and add the cream. Simmer 15 minutes longer very gently, taste to adjust seasoning and serve warm with croutons if desired. 

 

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5 Comments

  1. Posted November 11, 2012 at 6:25 am | Permalink

    Hi Joumana, this looks great, and great minds think alike as I’m planning on making my version of pumpkin soup today, using coconut milk and roasted apples. You recipe will b e next. Might you know the variety of pumpkin in the photo. I grow pumpkins, even one called an Iran pumpkin, but yours fascinates me as it seems quite unique. If you have a chance, would love to know its name, so I can look for some seed. Thank you.

  2. Posted November 11, 2012 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    WOW…that is a monster pumpkin. I like the simplicity of this soup, and how the real pumpkin flavor shines through.

  3. Posted November 11, 2012 at 5:24 pm | Permalink

    Wow that is one big pumpkin, and how cool that you grow them! The soup looks delicious and comforting!

  4. Posted November 11, 2012 at 5:45 pm | Permalink

    That is so interesting about how the shops there do currency. Again, your serving dishes are always so beautiful! I am a big fan of pumpkin and your soup looks so inviting.

  5. Posted November 11, 2012 at 7:21 pm | Permalink

    Perhaps this needs to be on my Thanksgiving table!

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