Loukoum ice-cream

October 16, 2013  • 

 

Happy Eid el-Adha 2014.

This ice-cream flavor (loukoum+vanilla) was created by Nayla, a former schoolmate, who is now head of one of the most successful ice-cream businesses in Beirut. I remember my disbelief when I first came back here and heard about her ice-cream venture; I remembered her being on a diet, I used to accompany her for  three months to her home and eat lunch with her; we weren’t friends, we did not have conversations like people who want to be friends, we just would get in the taxis-service (common method of transport here), go to her place and eat; it was always the same dish: Viennese scallops and coleslaw. Every day. Thinking back now, I was probably unwittingly Nayla’s designated  bodyguard (just surmising);  that  lasted three months until one day, while riding the taxi,  sniper fire got too intense and we had to duck to avoid catching bullets. After this episode, I stopped going to school and eating the Viennese breaded scallops at her house and never saw her again. 

We tried this flavor at a restaurant in our neighborhood and my daughter loved it; it was actually rose-flavored loukoum; here I used mastic-flavored loukoum that I mixed with vanilla ice-cream. Any flavor works! it is just that simple. 


INGREDIENTS: 4 SERVINGS

2 cups vanilla ice-cream

8 Loukoum, flavor of your choice

1. 30 minutes before serving the ice-cream, cut-up the loukoum and mix it with the ice-cream; place back in the freezer. Serve in individual bowls. 

NOTE: I have noticed that the ice-cream ordered at restaurants ends up with the loukoum’s texture being too hard, which is why I’d try to do the mixing as close to serving as possible. 

loukoum cream

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

14 Comments  •  Comments Feed

  1. Rosa says:

    That ice cream looks terrific! Something for me (I love loukoum, especially the honey-flavored ones).

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  2. Hélène (Cannes) says:

    Les souvenirs reviennet, lorsque l’on tient un blog … Bon, je t’avouerai que je préfère ton gâteau de pommes de terre et cette glace extraordinaire aux escalopes viennoises ! ;o)
    Bisous
    Hélène

  3. Margaret says:

    This looks great – but what is a loukoum?

    • Joumana says:

      @margaret: I need to have a loukoum post! a loukoum is a candy popular in the middle east and Turkey, where I believe it originated. it is like taffy, flavored with rose water usually and story goes that ladies used to eat it in the Sultan’s harem..

  4. Chiara says:

    this ice cream looks so delicious !

  5. Alicia (foodycat) says:

    Eid Mubarak to any of your readers who observe!

    Loukoum is usually known as Turkish Delight in the West – would that name be more familiar to people?

  6. Priya says:

    A def good icecream with some munch .Just now saw the wikipedia its a famous turkish food.Lovely colors.
    MyKitchenOdyssey

  7. Oui, Chef says:

    I do believe we still have some loukoum left from our trip to Istanbul….lucky me!

  8. s says:

    Joumana – what is “taxis-service”? I love loukoum, I want to get an ice cream maker at home, but my husband thinks that there is now space in the home either for him, or a new kitchen gadget 🙂 Hope you’ve been well x s

    • Joumana says:

      @Shayma: Haha, you crack me up! OK I did buy an ice-cream maker and I will admit, even without a husband, that thing is sitting in a cupboard accumulating dust. I mean, it is hard to get motivated to do all this work when there’s so many people willing to do it for you; a tax-service is the method of transport here in Lebanon and especially in Beirut; it is a car with a chauffeur going around and around; you flag him and share a ride with up to 4 other people for about US$1.25. They go just about everywhere and if that’s not far enough, then you hop on another one to get where you need to get.

  9. Kitchen Butterfly says:

    Wow. Such lovely ice cream. I LOVE the combination, and I can’t wait to get some loukoum to give it a go!

    I was shocked at the sniper fire bit. You always think these things happen to people ‘far, far, away’.

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