traditional dish

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Cabbage rolls with meat and rice

I will admit that this is not the most photogenic dish out of a Lebanese table; but boy is it tasty! For some reason, cabbage leaves are tougher in the US and it is a challenge to get them  silky soft.  In any case, long and gentle simmering is required here. 

Learned of a great […]

By |August 23rd, 2014|Salty|2 Comments
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Lying tabbouleh (Tabbuleh kezzabeh)

A very talented photographer I met on a job location was telling me about a tabbouleh called lying tabbouleh ( kezzabeh) ;  his grandmother had made it and its remarkable feature is the fact that it does not contain tomatoes. I scrambled for other sources that would mention this tabbouleh;  I found it in Lebanese celebrity […]

By |March 23rd, 2014|Salads|11 Comments
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Kibbeh roll, Aleppo-style (Mabroomeh)

This kibbeh roll, made like a jelly roll cake, is a creation of Aleppo cooks. It is a lot easier and faster to make than kibbeh balls. Two pounds of kibbeh paste will yield three long rolls, of which one or two can be frozen. 

The original recipes usually call for stuffing the roll with […]

By |March 19th, 2014|Salty|10 Comments
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Stuffed cabbage rolls

 

One of these dishes that taste better than it looks. What makes this dish so delightful is the tender leaves cooked in a lemony and garlicky broth. Learned a new tip: Prior to lining the pot with the rolled leaves,pour 1/3 cup of olive oil, three tablespooons of  mashed garlic and three tablespoons of […]

By |January 16th, 2014|Salty|12 Comments
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Manti

 

Manti or mante is a traditional Armenian dish; the closest Lebanese or Syrian equivalent to manti is shish barak, yet they are definitely not the same!

To make manti, you need the patience of an angel or (in my case) willing helpers; there were four of us filling these tiny little boats of dough with […]

By |January 9th, 2014|Salty|19 Comments
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Sweet roll (Kaak alleeta)

 

This sweet bread called alleeta is one of these old-fashioned treats that are resurfacing in some Beirut bakeries; my aunt recalls how there was always a street cart vendor selling them to kids after school. I did not have a recipe initially, but luckily found it on Facebook through Bass Semaan’s wall. 

INGREDIENTS: makes a dozen, […]

By |December 22nd, 2013|Sweets|6 Comments
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Ground meat kebab

I was thinking about my friend Phoebe and how fun it was to cook together. She taught me a few of her kitchen secrets and we would exchange stories about her native Egypt and my native Lebanon; Phoebe loves Lebanese food; she remarked to me once “you know, your food is very healthy you […]

By |May 14th, 2013|Salty|24 Comments
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Cauliflower salad (Arnabeet w tarator)

 

This is the perfect salad if you are stuck with a cauliflower and not sure what to do with it. 

It only takes minutes to prepare. It tastes fantastic and you will forget you are eating cauliflower. 

 The cauliflower is just boiled or steamed till tender, cut up and covered with the sauce. 

The sauce is a […]

By |February 27th, 2012|Salads|16 Comments
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Stuffed sheep sausages (Fawaregh)

A mediterranean culture that mainly relies on whole-grains and vegetables is going to take full advantage of the special  day when a lamb is available to feast on; thusly, every part of the animal is cooked in one way or another and intestines are no exception. Here, they are thoroughly cleaned with lemon, […]

By |December 17th, 2011|Salty|26 Comments
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Lebanese meatballs (Dawood Basha)

 

Lebanon (and the rest of the Levant) was under Ottoman rule until the end of WWI and back then high-ranking officers were called basha; hence the name of this dish, after an Armenian governor or pasha (basha is the Arabic pronounciation since p as a sound does not exist in Arabic) who was appointed […]

By |September 21st, 2011|Salty|32 Comments