Why don’t we eat this vegetable more?

June 9, 2011  • 

 

Anyone care to share their thoughts?

I am naming the taro.


Delicious interior, homely exterior.

Could that be the reason?

(I ate some taro frozen yogurt the other day)

(I bought some taro-flavored mochi)

The Lebanese cook it and serve it with tahini sauce.

Comments

28 Comments  •  Comments Feed

  1. bassem says:

    In Lebanon, taro is known as kilkass and is mainly grown along the Mediterranean coast. The leaves and stems are not consumed in Lebanon and the variety grown produces round to slightly oblong tubers that vary in size from a tennis ball to a small cantaloupe. Kilkass is a very popular winter dish in Lebanon and is prepared in two ways: “kilkass with lentils” which is a stew flavored with crushed garlic and lemon juice and “kilkass in tahini” (tahini is sesame seed paste). Another common method of preparing taro is to boil, peel then slice it into 1 cm thick slices, before frying and marinating in edible “red” sumac.

  2. Sarah Galvin (All Our Fingers in the Pie) says:

    Perhaps because most of us have no access to this vegetable? Even when I lived in a large city, I did not see taro root. But now I am curious!

  3. Lyndsey says:

    I have been trying any new to me roots that I see in the market. We have name, boniato, yuca, malanga, celeriac and I know a few others that I didn’t name here, but I haven’t run across taro yet. I’ll let you know.

  4. Louise says:

    That’s a very good question. I’ve never cooked taro at home, and am not even sure that I’ve ever eaten any. I think a drink I had from an Asian takeway a few months ago had taro in it, but that might be the only time I’ve ever had it. I’ve been trying a few new vegetables lately, and will have to seek out ways to try taro. I’ve tried cavolo nero for the first time recently, and next week I’m planning to try cooking chestnuts for the first time, as they’re in season here at the moment.

  5. Rosa says:

    I really have to buy that root veggie. It is quite difficult to find here, but one can buy it from Asian supermarkets.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  6. meredith says:

    I ate taro when I lived in Hawaii, but I haven’t seen any here in France yet.

  7. Anita says:

    Les topinanbours ! j’aime !
    j’ai adopte la recette Egyptienne qui est aussi tres bonne..
    encore merci pour vos belles recettes !

  8. T.W. Barritt says:

    Let’s name it Fred.

  9. Diane says:

    I have never heard of it before, I had to look it up. I don’t think I have ever seen it for sale here!! Dciane

  10. Nuts about food says:

    To my knowledge, I have never had taro…

  11. Hélène (Cannes) says:

    On n’a pas de taro à Cannes … Par contre, j’en trouve à Paris, quand je vais chez ma maman …
    Bisous
    Hélène

  12. Susan says:

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen one in person! I do wonder what it tastes like now.

  13. Tova says:

    I am with you 100%!! Taro is so, so delicious. And I never even knew until recently when I had it in a smoothie. I felt like I had been missing out on such a great thing!

  14. heguiberto says:

    I love taro or as we call it in Brazil: Inhame.
    There taro is mostly eaten in stews and in soups. For a delicious soup just peel and chop up some roots, saute in olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, onion, few tomatoes, water and simmer until soft. You can blend it for a smooth and cream consistency if you prefer. Voilá…. a healthy and nutritious meal is born!
    I confess though I am still learning to eat taro when prepared in ice creams, cakes, pies and other amazing versions from South East Asia

    H

  15. deana says:

    I know I’ve had it but never make it… now you have me curious!

  16. Scienter says:

    I’ve only had these in chip form. I’ve seen them at my grocery store, but I didn’t know what it was!

  17. Murasaki Shikibu says:

    Availability certainly plays a role. In the Carrefour in Spain, I can find Cassava, one kind of sweet potato and a few different kinds of potatoes. In Japan you can find a larger variety of these. Some also dislike anything sticky or have become excessively boring about food and will say things like: I prefer to eat normal potatoes.

  18. Steve @ HPD says:

    big in new zealand.

    kinda like a celery root … needs a make-over!

  19. betty says:

    i LOVE taro! this is how i have it 🙂

    http://bettysbites.blogspot.com/2011/05/taro-in-coconut-cream-and-introduction.html

  20. Andre Youssef says:

    I’m looking for the recipe momy (from Kourah) made for us several times, The name of the dish was “abou shushe” and it was made of taro and lentilszz; a very very delicious dish, If I remember she fried lots of onion (cut in 8 pieces each) and taro (cut in 2 or 3 pieces each) until golden. Then she put half cooked lentils and some dried garlic, Ten minutes more of cooking altoguether, and it’s ready. Eat with some lemon juice.

  21. Andre Youssef says:

    I forgot. put some water with lentils, because it’s almost a soup.

  22. Andre Youssef says:

    I’m looking for the recipe momy (from Kourah) made for us several times, The name of the dish was “abou shushe” and it was made of taro and lentilszz; a very very delicious dish, If I remember she fried lots of onion (cut in 8 pieces each) and taro (cut in 2 or 3 pieces each) until golden. Then she put some water and half cooked lentils and some fried garlic (I’m not sure about it), Ten minutes more of cooking altoguether, and it’s ready. Add some lemon juice when eating, It’s almost a soup and is delicious with bread,

    • Joumana says:

      @Andre: What a coincidence! I was thinking about this dish today and will certainly make it soon; it is done the way you describe too, frying the taro and the onions to get the most flavor!

  23. ANDRE YOUSSEF says:

    Hi Joumana, do you know rhe details of this recipe, as its done in Koura, Lebanon? About garlic and pepper, for example.

    • Joumana says:

      @André: I am planning to make it soon and also visit a friend who lives in the Koura. Can you be patient and wait until that happens and I will tell you exactly how they make it there. (A matter of weeks)

  24. ANDRE YOUSSEF says:

    OK, thank you, Could you please ask your friend about some stews with onions and bourghoul made in Koura with the vegetables qataif (amaranthus) and khubaizi (malva)? Very special dishes.

  25. "E" says:

    The photo you have here is that of the Asian taro found in South East Asia. The variety grown in Lenanon looks slightly different but the difference is recognizable.

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